GROW as a disciple of Jesus: Time spent waiting is an opportunity to love and serve

[Jesus] answered them, “It is not for you to know the times or seasons that the Father has established by his own authority. (Acts 1:7)

A recent traffic jam gave me time to think about how much time we spend waiting and planning. We wait for food, parties, clothes from the dryer and Friday. We wait in the dentist office, the gym, the carpool line and in the checkout lane. I think we actually spend more time waiting than doing.

Our new hire expects a promotion right away

Our new hire has been with us for just a month and is already expecting to be promoted. How do I manage these unrealistic expectations? 

Option No. 1 – Fire him. That would deliver a bracing dose of reality, but pretty harsh.

Option No. 2 – Promote him. But then you would be joining his fantasy world.

Option No. 3 – Enlighten him. Teach him a better way to harness his ambition.

If he wants to succeed, he should add the south pole of humility to the north pole of magnanimity.

She says: I don't want to homeschool our kids

Michael wants us to homeschool our kids. Not only do I think that means raising them in a bubble, I would be primarily responsible to be the teacher.

He says: We need to know what they're being taught

I think it’s important that we, as parents, know exactly what our children are being taught. The only way to ensure that is to do it ourselves. It makes the most sense for Sarah to do it; we can’t afford to lose my income.

Building a bridge of trust

In 2018, FAITH continues to offer the column, Discipleship 101, based on Sherry Weddell’s books, Forming Intentional Disciples: The Path to Knowing and Following Jesus (2012) and Fruitful Discipleship: Living the Mission of Jesus in the Church and the World (2017). Sherry is a leading voice in the Catholic world in the field of forming missionary disciples – engaged Catholics who strive to grow as disciples of Jesus and go evangelize, sharing the Gospel with others.

Are all religions simply different paths to the same God?

In his work, “The World’s Religions,” author Huston Smith highlights an 19th century Hindu saint, Ramakrishna, as an illustration of a conviction that the various major religions are alternate paths to the same goal. Ramakrishna, after experiencing each of the major religions, concluded that there existed an essential unity among them. He wrote, “God has made different religions to suit different aspirations, times, and countries.